Tripleshot’s New 2022 Kit Designs

Last fall, the board set a goal of introducing a new kit design in 2022. We asked if newish Tripleshot member and accomplished Kwakwaka’wakw and Coast Salish artist Carey Newman would help. Carey had recently designed the orange jersey for our Ride to Remember on the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. He has also designed a National Team kit for Triathlon Canada and created a few public art pieces here in Victoria.

In the past, Tripleshot invited input into our kit design from club members, some of which was passionately delivered! This time around, we wanted to honour Carey’s gifts and let him work freely and with few parameters. To still allow for member input, we asked Carey to develop two designs so members could vote on which one they preferred.

Over the past eight months, Carey worked closely with club director Justine Johnson to create the first complete refresh of our look since 2018. Instead of requiring members to reject one design in favour of another, Carey developed a regular kit and one that he dubbed a “gravel” version. We loved both designs and thought the best way to give members a choice would be to make both available at the same time!

Carey’s comments on his regular kit design:

This design is meant to both acknowledge the Lekwungen speaking Peoples, upon whose traditional territories we ride, and pay homage to the history of Tripleshot Cycling Club. The purple camas flower is one we see on our rides and a source of sustenance for the First Nations up and down this island. The water surrounding it represents the island we live on and echoes the cog that has been a feature of Tripleshot branding for the last 10 years. The geometric mountains are indicative of the vistas we see and the mountains we climb, while the diamond shapes draw inspiration from the iconic argyle that has been a constant feature of the club’s kits going back to 2008.

And his thoughts on the gravel kit:

When I was designing the regular kit, I was thinking about ways to integrate the various elements from the previous jerseys. Also, looking at the geometrics of the camas flower, it struck me how the angles were reminiscent of spokes on a wheel. Although I really liked the design, it felt like it didn’t maintain the same connection to the history of Tripleshot, so instead, I started to imagine a gravel jersey that was related to, but distinctive from the regular one. Another idea that I really liked was the camas combined with the cog, but when I enlarged it on the jersey, it seemed too bold. Instead I put the wheel as the main design on the gravel jersey and put the cog on the sleeve. This way, the two kits tell the whole story of the past, present and (if members order these things) the future of Tripleshot.

We will post again soon with all the details of when and how to order your new kit.

We are grateful to Carey for sharing his talent, his skill, and his passion — and for his commitment to Tripleshot Cycling. We hope you enjoy the new kit and will join us in thanking him for our incredible new design.

Gilakas’la, Hayalthkin’geme!

– The Board – 

About Carey Newman:

Carey’s traditional name is Hayalthkin’geme. He is a mutli-disciplinary Indigenous artist, master carver, filmmaker, author, and public speaker. Through his father, he is Kwakwak’awakw from the Kukwekum, Giiksam, and WaWalaby’ie clans of Northern Vancouver Island, and Coast Salish from Cheam of the Sto:lo Nation along the upper Fraser Valley. Through his mother, his ancestors are settlers of English, Irish, and Scottish heritage.

In his artistic practice, Carey strives to highlight Indigenous, social, and environmental issues as he examines the impacts of colonialism and capitalism, harnessing the power of material truth to unearth memory and trigger the necessary emotion to drive positive change. He is also interested in engaging with the community and incorporating innovative methods derived from traditional teachings and Indigenous worldviews into his process.

Carey was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal in 2017 and was named to the Order of British Columbia in 2018. He is the Impact Chair in Indigenous Art Practice at the University of Victoria.

Calling all U23 / development level road riders!

Tripleshot Cycling in partnership with 94Forward invite applications from U23 / development level road riders to attend a three session coached clinic focused on developing road skills and fitness in advance of the upcoming road season. The clinic days are part of a pilot project for services and programs for u23 / development level riders aiming for national teams.

Interested athletes must commit to attending sessions in the Victoria area on February 26, March 5 & March 12 from 9am through 4pm(lunch will be provided) . In addition to great coaching from former National Team coach Houshang Amiri and Pete Disera, Olympian, each selected athlete will receive a $500 honorarium from 94Forward.

We hope to select up to 5 male and 5 female developmental athletes. Applications will be accepted by email to development.tripleshot@gmail.com up until 4pm on Friday February 18th. Apply by sending a cover letter (email) setting out how such a clinic could assist you with your 2022 goals and confirming that your current coach and/or club is supportive of your attendance. Please note that in light of the current public health emergency only fully vaccinated athletes will be able to participate. Selected athletes will be notified by email and by notice published on the Tripleshot website.

Tripleshot is the 2021 B.C. Club of the Year!

Adding to our wins in 2014 and 2018, Cycling B.C. has again named us their Club of the Year! 🏆

From the Cycling B.C. announcement: “Tripleshot Cycling is a club based in Victoria that supports riders of all disciplines. They are known for also supporting adaptive riders and being inclusive to all. They encourage individuality while making each member proud to be a part of something bigger. Managed by volunteers, they promote fair play and the simple pleasure of riding together as a community. Throughout Covid, they have inspired confidence and been a beacon to all of us and found often creative ways to help us each stay connected and engaged described by a member. Tripleshot has been a large supporter of giving back to the community and their diverse group of members has allowed them to be a part of many impactful fundraisers and help raise awareness for many different organizations and causes.”

Okay, stop: we’re blushing *hard*! 😊 Much love and gratitude to Cycling B.C., our volunteers, sponsors, and every one of YOU for helping create this special cycling community. ❤️

Here’s a little celebration edit to help you do the happy dance… 🕺🏽💃🏼

https://vimeo.com/670367910

 

Cycling BC Launches Orange Jersey Campaign in Support of Residential School Survivors

In honour of the survivors of Canada’s residential schools, their families, and communities, Cycling BC, with the help of Jakroo Canada, is launching an orange cycling jersey designed by Tripleshot Cycling Club member and Indigenous artist Carey Newman. Through the orange jersey, Cycling BC aims to raise funds to bring awareness to the tragic history of Canada’s residential school system and help open up the conversation among our cycling community as we pedal towards healing and reconciliation.

“When Tripleshot Cycling and Carey Newman presented us with this opportunity to collaborate, we were on board immediately. It has been something we have been wanting to do for some time and Carey’s amazing design really hit a chord with us,” says Erin Waugh, CEO of Cycling BC. “As a cycling community, this is just one of the many ways we can help raise awareness of the issues that Indigenous people face and hopefully it opens up a dialogue that leads to better understanding.”

Net proceeds from the sale of the jerseys will be directed to charities and organizations that support residential school survivor groups across Canada. We will do our best to direct funds based on the province where the sale of the jerseys originates.

The orange jersey will be available in adult and youth sizing in a short sleeve road version and a long sleeve mountain bike version. A technical hoodie using the same design as the jerseys will be available for sale as well. Pre-orders for the orange jersey can be made at cyclingbc.net/shop now until October 7th and will ship out for delivery in early November.

About the design (from the artist): On Thursday, May 27th, I unveiled a hands-on hearts on totem project at my daughter’s school. The hope and inspiration of that morning, working with children, made for a stark contrast to the despair that came when later that day the Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc announced that they had located 215 unmarked graves at the Kamloops residential school. Although it took me a few days to process the grief and weight of that moment, something that became very clear was that the graves of these Indigenous children were forcing Canadians to reckon with the humble exceptionalism that has anchored this country’s collective identity for too long. That is when I began to work on creating a new design using hearts and hands along with the number 215+. Together they represent both heartache and hope, and in further acknowledging the truth of Canada’s foundations, another step along the journey towards reconciliation.

About the artistCarey Newman, whose traditional name is Hayalthkin’geme, is a multi-disciplinary Indigenous artist, master carver, filmmaker, author and public speaker.

Through his father, he is Kwakwak’awakw from the Kukwekum, Giiksam, and WaWalaby’ie clans of northern Vancouver Island, and Coast Salish from Cheam of the Sto:lo Nation along the upper Fraser Valley. Through his mother, his ancestors are Settlers of English, Irish, and Scottish heritage.

In his artistic practice, he strives to highlight Indigenous, social, and environmental issues as he examines the impacts of colonialism and capitalism, harnessing the power of material truth to unearth memory and trigger the necessary emotion to drive positive change. He is also interested in engaging with community and incorporating innovative methods derived from traditional teachings and Indigenous worldviews into his process.

Highlights from his career include being selected as the master carver of the Cowichan 2008 Spirit Pole, a journey that saw him travel the province of BC sharing the carving experience of carving a 20’ totem with over 11,000 people, a major commission entitled “Dancing Wind” installed at the 2010 Olympic Games, Athlete’s Village in Whistler, premiering the documentary he wrote and co-directed at the Vancouver International Film Festival as well as publishing his first book. He also continues to create for and consult with corporations, government agencies, collectors and museums around the world.

Perhaps his most influential work, The Witness Blanket, made of items collected from residential schools, government buildings and churches across Canada, deals with the subject of Truth and Reconciliation. It is now part of the collection at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

Carey was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal in 2017 and was named to the Order of British Columbia in 2018 and he is the Impact Chair in Indigenous Art Practice at the University of Victoria.

Order your jersey here